Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp


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So challenge all your senses as you venture into the unfamiliar. Myths about aging can contribute to a failing memory. Middle-aged and older learners do worse on memory tasks when they're exposed to negative stereotypes about aging and memory, and better when the messages are positive about memory preservation into old age. People who believe that they are not in control of their memory function — joking about "senior moments" too often, perhaps — are less likely to work at maintaining or improving their memory skills and therefore are more likely to experience cognitive decline.

If you believe you can improve and you translate that belief into practice, you have a better chance of keeping your mind sharp. If you don't need to use mental energy remembering where you laid your keys or the time of your granddaughter's birthday party, you'll be better able to concentrate on learning and remembering new and important things.

Take advantage of calendars and planners, maps, shopping lists, file folders, and address books to keep routine information accessible. Designate a place at home for your glasses, purse, keys, and other items you use often.


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When you want to remember something you've just heard, read, or thought about, repeat it out loud or write it down. That way, you reinforce the memory or connection. For example, if you've just been told someone's name, use it when you speak with him or her: Repetition is most potent as a learning tool when it's properly timed. It's best not to repeat something many times in a short period, as if you were cramming for an exam.

Instead, re-study the essentials after increasingly longer periods of time — once an hour, then every few hours, then every day. Spacing out periods of study helps improve memory and is particularly valuable when you are trying to master complicated information, such as the details of a new work assignment.

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Studies have shown that you can help prevent cognitive decline and reduce the risk of dementia with some basic good health habits: Keep learning A higher level of education is associated with better mental functioning in old age. Use all your senses The more senses you use in learning something, the more of your brain that will be involved in retaining the memory.

Believe in yourself Myths about aging can contribute to a failing memory.

Top 10 Tips to Keep Your Brain Young

Prioritize your brain use If you don't need to use mental energy remembering where you laid your keys or the time of your granddaughter's birthday party, you'll be better able to concentrate on learning and remembering new and important things. Repeat what you want to know When you want to remember something you've just heard, read, or thought about, repeat it out loud or write it down. They were not asked to remember what they saw. Later, they were shown a set of images, this time without odors, and asked to indicate which they'd seen before.

They had excellent recall for all odor-paired pictures, and especially for those associated with pleasant smells. Brain imaging indicated that the piriform cortex, the main odor-processing region of the brain, became active when people saw objects originally paired with odors, even though the smells were no longer present and the subjects hadn't tried to remember them.

So challenge all your senses as you venture into the unfamiliar.

7 ways to keep your memory sharp at any age - Harvard Health

For example, try to guess the ingredients as you smell and taste a new restaurant dish. Give sculpting or ceramics a try, noticing the feel and smell of the materials you're using. Myths about aging can contribute to a failing memory. Middle-aged and older learners do worse on memory tasks when they're exposed to negative stereotypes about aging and memory , and better when the messages are positive about memory preservation into old age. People who believe that they are not in control of their memory function are less likely to work at maintaining or improving their memory skills and therefore are more likely to experience cognitive decline.


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  5. If you believe you can improve and you translate that belief into practice, you have a better chance of keeping your mind sharp. If you don't need to use mental energy remembering where you laid your keys or the time of your granddaughter's birthday party, you'll be better able to concentrate on learning and remembering new and important things. Take advantage of calendars and planners, maps, shopping lists, file folders, and address books to keep routine information accessible. Designate a place at home for your glasses, purse, keys, and other items you use often. Remove clutter from your office or home to minimize distractions, so you can focus on new information that you want to remember.

    When you want to remember something you've just heard, read, or thought about, repeat it out loud or write it down. That way, you reinforce the memory or connection. For example, if you've just been told someone's name, use it when you speak with him or her: And don't hesitate to ask for information to be repeated.

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    Repetition is most potent as a learning tool when it's properly timed. It's best not to repeat something many times in a short period, as if you were cramming for an exam. Instead, re-study the essentials after increasingly longer periods of time — once an hour, then every few hours, then every day. Spacing out periods of study is particularly valuable when you are trying to master complicated information, such as the details of a new work assignment. Research shows that spaced rehearsal improves recall not only in healthy people but also in those with certain physically based cognitive problems, such as those associated with multiple sclerosis.

    This is a creative way to remember lists. Mnemonic devices can take the form of acronyms such as RICE to remember first-aid advice for injured limbs: Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation or sentences such as the classic "Every good boy does fine" to remember the musical notes E, G, B, D, and F on the lines of the treble clef. Each year, osteoporosis contributes to more than 2 million bone fractures in the United States.

    Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp

    This Special Health Report, Osteoporosis: A guide to prevention and treatment , can help you keep your bones strong and healthy, and avoid fractures. It describes how you can prevent and treat osteoporosis through diet, exercise, and medications. You'll also find advice on choosing a calcium supplement, tips on fall-proofing your home, and help with putting together a personalized plan to preserve or boost your bone strength. I've heard that club soda, seltzer water, and sparkling mineral waters rob the bones of calcium.

    Warnings about the harmful effects of carbonated beverages on bone emerge from time to time.

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    The theory is that the phosphoric acid phosphate used to enhance flavor in some carbonated beverages can interfere with calcium absorption and result in the loss of calcium from bone. Fortunately, there's no good evidence that a high phosphate intake affects bone metabolism or bone density. Still, carbonated beverages have long been associated with low bone density and fractures in adolescent girls.

    To investigate this association in adults, researchers at Tufts University examined data from 2, women and men ages 49 to 69 involved in the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. They assessed dietary intake and measured bone mineral density BMD at the spine and hip.

    Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp
    Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp
    Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp
    Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp
    Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp Save Your Brain: The 5 Things You Must Do to Keep Your Mind Young and Sharp

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